White Nose Syndrome: what you should know

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Tennessee officials from the Wildlife Resources Agency have been teaming up with the Nature Conservancy to research the habitat needs of an endangered species of bats in the state. The Indiana bat numbers have been declining in Tennessee since the discovery of a fungal disease that harms hibernating bats, known as White Nose Syndrome. They have been primarily focusing on female bats and how this syndrome affects their ability to reproduce.

White Nose Syndrome is likely an exotic disease originating in Europe. It started in New York state in 2006 and has since spread throughout the United States killing millions of bats. WNS causes high death rates and fast population declines in the species affected by it, and scientists predict some regional extinction of bat species if the right steps are not taken to combat the sickness.

For information on bat control, contact Patriot Wildlife Control.

TWRA tracks bat population to combat white nose syndrome

Researchers from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency are teaming up with the Nature Conservancy in Tennessee in an effort to better understand the habitat needs of an endangered bat species in the state.

The Indiana bat has been a federally listed endangered species since 1973. Their numbers have been in decline in Tennessee since the discovery of White Nose Syndrome, a fungal disease that affects cave roosting bats.

“The Indiana bat uses two types of habitat,” said TWRA Biologist Daniel Istvanko. “They spend the winter in caves and then during the warmer months they will be on the landscape roosting in the forest.” Read more

Summary: The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Nature Conservancy are teaming up to research the habitat needs of the Indiana bat, an endangered species in the state. The population of these bats has been steadily declining due to a fungal disease known as White Nose Syndrome.

What Is White-nose Syndrome?

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is the fungal disease killing bats in North America. Research indicates the fungus that causes WNS is likely exotic, introduced from Europe. What started in New York in 2006 has spread to more than half of the United States and five Canadian provinces by August 2016, leaving millions of dead bats in its path. WNS causes high death rates and fast population declines in the species affected by it, and scientists predict some regional extinction of bat species. Learn more

Summary: White Nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that affects hibernating bat populations. It is likely an exotic disease that originated in Europe and was introduced in the United States in New York in 2006. It has since spread throughout the United States and Canada.