How they can gnaw through your wires

A recent house fire was caused by faulty electrical wires likely due to being chewed by squirrels. The fire department stated that sometimes squirrels will chew through aluminum wires and that will cause the meter box to catch fire. Squirrels can easily gain access to your home via small holes, vents or chimneys left unattended and can cause issues with your electrical system. Many power outages are caused by the furry little creatures.

Wilson County, Tennessee has become a central focus in the effort to preserve and rebuild numbers of a hurting bat population. The Indiana bat has become endangered and the numbers have fallen almost 80% in areas of the state. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has erected nine artificial trees in the area to help attract Indiana bats that migrate to Wilson County from hibernation caves nearby. Bats play a very important role in the local ecosystem, especially by preying on insects and other agricultural pests.

For information on squirrel control and bat removal, pay a visit to Patriot Wildlife Control.

Severed wire causes electrical fire, likely cause by squirrel

A squirrel chewing through an aluminum line likely is to blame Thursday for causing a Knoxville house fire.

The Knoxville Fire Department contained the blaze at 2329 Woodbine Ave. to the attic and back section. It started at the meter box, apparently after a squirrel chewed through a grounding wire that fed into the meter box, according to KFD Capt. D.J. Corcoran. Read more

Summary: A recent house fire was caused by faulty electrical wires likely due to being chewed by squirrels. The fire department stated that sometimes squirrels will chew through aluminum wires.

Wilson County is vital to the survival of a bat species

Wilson County has become central in an effort to rebuild numbers of an endangered species of bat whose demise could affect your pocketbook.

Indiana bats have dwindled by more than 80% in priority counting areas of Tennessee in the last eight years, according to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. There were 2,325 Indiana bats recorded in those counting areas in 2019 compared with more than 12,700 in 2011. See more

Summary: Wilson County, Tennessee has become a central focus in the effort to preserve and rebuild numbers of a hurting bat population. The Indiana bat has become endangered and the numbers have fallen almost 80% in areas of the state.