Snakes serve important purpose for ecosystem

Eastern Tennessee is home to several species of venomous snakes that most would view as a scary nuisance animal. They can be dangerous, however they serve a greater purpose for our ecosystem. Snakes help to keep the rodent populations in the state at bay. The timber rattlesnake and copperhead, both of which are venomous snakes, serve an important role within the environment. Those snakes consume a variety of small rodents, especially rats and mice. They can even eat other snakes, as well as lizards and birds.

A near record-breaking copperhead snake was found in the western part of Tennessee. The snake measured at 49.5 inches long, which is just three inches shy of a world record for the species. Officials have stated that people should not be afraid to go into the woods as a snake growing to this size is rare, however, they did stress that this is the time of year when snakes are more active. With the weather turning colder, they are looking for dens.

For information on snake removal, pay a visit to Patriot Wildlife Control.

In Tennessee, venomous snakes serve purpose

East Tennessee is home to several venomous snakes. And while chances are most Chattanooga-area residents won’t come across one, wildlife experts say it’s important to know the role they play in the ecosystem.

“Many species of wildlife aren’t given proper credit for their contributions to the environment,” said Scott Dykes, biologist for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. “Just as bats eat millions of mosquitoes and crop-damaging insects, snakes help keep our rodent populations in check.” Learn more

Summary: Eastern Tennessee is home to several species of venomous snakes. They play an important role in the ecosystem by keeping rodent populations low.

Near record-breaking venomous snake found in Tennessee

A near record-breaking copperhead snake was found in Tennessee’s Hardeman County.

The venomous snake measured 49.5 inches long, just about three inches shy of the world record. Unfortunately for the snake, its life came to an untimely end.

“It darted out straight out in front of me, and I hit it,” Bub Stevens said. “I thought, ‘That looked like a snake.'” Read more

Summary: An almost record-breaking venomous copperhead snake was found in the western part of Tennessee recently. The snake was just three inches shy of a world record for the snake species.