Preventing the diseases in Tennessee

Distemper is a viral virus and it typically infects nocturnal animals like raccoons. When they contract it, these animals will become abnormally active during the day. The Pigeon Forge police department received a spike in the number of calls reporting animals that looked rabid or sick in August. After receiving more calls than usual, the department put out a warning about the signs and symptoms of an animal with distemper.

In October, Tennessee officials fought to prevent the spreading of another disease often found in animals like raccoons. The Tennessee Department of Health worked to prevent the spread of rabies by raccoons through the distribution of vaccine packets coated with fishmeal. The packets were distributed from planes and helicopters along Tennessees borders.

For more information about raccoon control, visit Patriot Wildlife Control.

Pigeon Forge Police received calls about distemper in August

Canine distemper reports aren’t a new concept in East Tennessee, and All Creatures Wildlife Service owner Paul Osborne stresses the symptoms are something to look out for.

“Maybe drooling, it’s fur is matted. It’s not really rabies — it’s distemper,” he said.

By definition, distemper is a viral virus and it typically infects nocturnal animals like raccoons. When they contract it, these animals will become abnormally active during the day. Learn more

Summary: Distemper is a viral virus and it typically infects nocturnal animals like raccoons. When they contract it, these animals will become abnormally active during the day. Officials released a warning on signs and symptoms that an animal has distemper.

Tennessee raccoons get vaccinated for rabies

The Tennessee Department of Health is working to prevent the spread of rabies by raccoons through the distribution of vaccine packets coated with fishmeal.

The baiting program takes place in cooperation with the U.S. Agriculture Department along Tennessee’s borders with Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia. Read more

Summary: Tennessee officials fought to prevent the spread of rabies by raccoons in October. They distributed vaccines packets via helicopters and planes.