Tennessee wildlife officials taking big steps

The National Park Service took drastic measures to help save endangered bats in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. During the summer months of this year, they reopened a cave that had been closed for a year. The cave will serve as a hibernation spot for the endangered Indiana bat, little brown bat, and the tri-colored bat. The white nose syndrome affects hibernating bats and causes them to waken multiple times and starve to death before the springtime.

Another step was taken earlier this year to help endangered bat populations. Wildlife officials built artificial homes for the threatened Indiana bat. They created artificial trees to mimic the roosting habitat of the bats to hopefully encourage them to hibernate there and better combat the effects of white nose syndrome.

For information on bat removal, visit Patriot Wildlife Control.

National Park Service Takes Step to Save Bats

In the summer of 2019, the near-silence of a secluded, mossy hollow in Great Smoky Mountains National Park was disturbed by the sound of rock drills and hammers.

Half inside a cave, a team of wildlife technicians and trail crew members were moving a pile of debris that blocked the entrance.

Ordinarily, the National Park Service would not do something like this. Natural processes, like erosion, are supposed to occur within the parks to maintain their wilderness character.

But in this case, wildlife conservation officials decided to do something unprecedented. Learn more

Summary: The National Park Service took drastic measures to help save endangered bats in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. During the summer months of this year, they reopened a cave that had been closed.

Artificial homes for endangered bats with deadly disease

Endangered Indiana bats with a deadly disease are being tracked to Wilson County, where wildlife officials are building artificial homes for them.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is now installing artificial habitats to help those bats with Whitenose Syndrome.

Crews have installed nine artificial trees to mimic the summer roosting habitat of the Indiana bat, on a private farm in Wilson County. Read more

Summary: The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency set up artificial habitats for endangered bats. Bats in the area have been battling white nose syndrome.