The animals take over abandoned spots

Bats are native to and populous throughout the state of Tennessee. So, it is not uncommon to find them taking up residence in caves or abandoned structures. An abandoned Confederate Army fort along the Mississippi River has become a new home for hundreds of bats. The structure provides a good home for the bats through the year and especially in the winter. The fort shares many of the same characteristics as a natural cave formation.

Another area in Tennessee has been taken over by bat colonies. A researcher came face to face with hundreds of bats when he lowered himself into a vertical cave structure in middle Tennessee. The species of bats hiding in this cave is known as Rafinesque’s big-eared bats. State scientists believe that this is the largest colony of this species in Tennessee.

For tips on bat removal, visit Patriot Wildlife Control.

Bats take over decaying Confederate fortification

An abandoned Confederate Army fortification along the Mississippi River is facing another occupying force after 155 years — this time involving bats.

Multiple species have taken over the shadowy bowels of historic Fort Wright, built in 1861, according to biologists with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Photos shared by the state showed bats fluttering against the structure’s barreled ceiling, while others are seen cramming themselves into cracks in the brick walls. Read more

Summary: An abandoned Confederate Army fort along the Mississippi River has become a new home for hundreds of bats. The structure provides a good home for the bats through the year.

Hundreds of eyes stare back when researcher lowers into Tennessee cave

A scientist exploring the walls of a Tennessee “pit cave” came face to face this week with hundreds of bats piled on top of each other in the dark — a creepy sight he was hoping to find.

The exact location wasn’t revealed, but bat researcher Daniel Istvanko said the forbidding vertical cave is in Middle Tennessee, according to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

“Hanging from a rope, he was able to snap a few pictures and leave without disturbing the sleeping colony,” the state agency posted on Facebook. See more

Summary: A researcher came face to face with hundreds of bats when he lowered himself into a vertical cave structure in middle Tennessee. The species of bats hiding in this cave is known as Rafinesque’s big-eared bats.