National park has sightings of the armored creature

The Nine Banded Armadillo has been added to the official list of species inhabiting the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. There have been sightings of roadkill in the last few years but never one caught live. A trail cam caught the armored creature roaming around the area. Armadillos first took up residence in Tennessee in 2013 near Sewanee on the Plateau and they usually avoid lower temperatures, which comes along with higher elevations, like in the smokies.

According to a Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency wildlife diversity biologist urges people to keep a clear distance if you should happen to encounter an armadillo. Some armadillos can carry the bacteria that causes leprosy, so it is best to avoid direct contact with the creature. Most times, the armadillos are harmless and if you just allow them some space they’ll move on from your yard or other space you are occupying.

For information on armadillo control and removal, contact Patriot Wildlife Control.

First armadillo confirmed in Smokies

An armored invader is now the new king of the mountain in the Smokies.

Well, at least, there’s a new animal on the list of official species in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  A wildlife camera at Newfound Gap captured several photos of a nine-banded armadillo.

“It’s the first documented, live armadillo inside the park.  We had some sightings of roadkill just outside the park boundary in the last few years. But we never had an armadillo within the interior of the park, dead or alive,” said Bill Stiver, GSMNP supervisory wildlife biologist. Read more

Summary: The Nine Banded Armadillo has been added to the official list of species inhabiting the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. There have been sightings of roadkill in the last few years but never one caught live.

If you see an armadillo, leave it alone

If you see an armadillo, just leave it alone.

That’s the word from Chris Simpson, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency wildlife diversity biologist.

He said the nine-banded armadillo has been seen in our area since the early 2000s.

It’s hard to know how many are actually in the area because of their size and lifestyle, Simpson said. Learn more

Summary: Some armadillos can carry the bacteria that causes leprosy, so it is best to avoid direct contact with the creature. Most times, armadillos are harmless and will not bother you.